The UltimateAir® News

UltimateAir Sponsering local Energy Discussion

Posted on Fri, Oct 19, 2012

Report on Energy and Climate Change:
Problems and Opportunities

Talk and Discussion with Pat Murphy
Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions


Today the world is facing increasing CO2 from fossil fuels, declining quantities of suchfuels, record income and wealth inequity, and a population that has reached 7 billion.

The common factor to these is cheap plentiful fossil fuel energy, which will not be as cheap in the future. CO2 has reached 387 parts per million (ppm) in the Earth’s atmosphere – above the 350 ppm considered to be the maximum allowable without causing damage to the climate.

Most people, over 95%, assume some kind of technological breakthrough will deal with these issues. Possibly 5% believe that our current lifestyle can be maintained with renewable energy and breakthrough bio-fuels. Far less than 1% of the population has any sense of the real need to reduce per capita energy consumption.

Technology breakthroughs such as fuel-cell or electric cars have not borne the promised fruit. Nuclear fusion has made no progress. Carbon sequestration is still only a dream. Renewable energy is growing rapidly but from a very small base. The low energy density and intermittency of most renewable energy sources are often overlooked limitations. The main focuses to date, electrification of transport and “green” building are still in the range of 1% improvements.

Community Solutions proposes a paradigm shift – Plan C, where the C stands for curtailment and community. This involves measuring the ideas and proposals that are so popular by using such evaluation techniques as “energy return from energy invested” (EROEI) and Lifecycle Analysis. These techniques are ways of measuring the feasibility or fallibility of proposed options. Using per capita measurements in a global context is also vital to determining what is possible. It addresses the huge difference in energy recourse use between the first and third world.

Today it is clear that a CO2 reduction target is necessary. According to the UN’S International Protocol on Climate Change the target must be to reduce CO2 80% by 2050. Community Solutions is exploring ways to do this in the areas of personal consumption: our cars, homes, and food, more than 60% of the nation’s CO2 emissions.

Pat will discuss possible solutions in detail, sharing what is being done in the three consumer areas – by individuals, private organizations and the U.S. government, and make specific recommendations for personal actions one can take.

When: November 15 from 7pm to 9pm Where: The Dairy Barn
8000 Dairy Lane, Athens OH 45701
For more information call 740 466-5289

Tags: Homeowners, energy efficient, recoupaerator, UltimateAir., green building, Energy

Energy Recovery Ventilation or Heat Recovery Ventilation

Posted on Mon, Jul 23, 2012

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             There is quite a bit of debate out there as to where ERVs should be used and where HRVs should be used. For those of you who do not know, HRVs, like ERVs, are ventilation systems that transfer heat. However, unlike ERVs they do not transfer moisture.  We see a lot of maps claiming that ERVs should be used in the humid South, to reduce incoming moisture, while HRVs should be used in the colder North. However, these maps are inconsistent (for example, some suggest HRVs in the arid Southwest). Moreover they are wrong; ERVs can and should be used everywhere.
           While the "Bermuda Triangle" comparison might be something of a hyperbole, instances where an HRV would make more sense are few and far between. If you do not need to actively increase or decrease the humidity level inside your home at anytime during the year, then sure, an HRV would be an acceptable choice. At the same time, so would the ERV because you will not just be using the moisture transfer ability. But the claim that ERVs are bad outside of humid regions is just untrue. By transferring moisture as well as heat, they effectively assist moderate indoor humidity for optimal comfort and safety. Buildings in the dry Southwest that need humidity benefit from ERVs. Homes in the cold North would suffer similarly without retaining some humidity inside. The myth that HRVs are prefered in the North is based on a freezing problem that ERVs experienced twenty years ago. This problem has long since been fixed. However, some still use it as a misleading justification. The HRV industry survives on this misinformation.

Energy Recovery Ventilators are more efficient and practical. They are the ventilation system of choice for Passive Homes and commercial buildings. If you are making the investment for your health and your home, why would you go halfway? Maybe in a place where the laws of physics don't apply, like the Bermuda Triangle. Get lost HRVs.

Tags: indoor air quality, Home, ERV, energy efficient, Air Ventilation System, HRV, ERV or HRV

A New Perspective on Indoor Air Quality

Posted on Mon, Jun 04, 2012


    Hi! My name is Henry and I have recently begun working with UltimateAir.
This summer I will delve into health and energy efficiency in the context of the RecoupAerator: an Energy Recovery Ventilation system (ERV). Prior to joining this company, I had little knowledge of ERVs let alone the urgent need to ventilate my home. Doesn’t air conditioning bring in fresh air? Besides bugs and the occasional rogue bird, what’s wrong with opening a window? I had to take a deep breath and admit I was clueless to the issue. Parts of this blog will reveal how oblivious I was to the role of ERVs in ‘green’ home technology. By effectively filtering or diluting indoor toxins such as radon, pollen, and various formaldehydes, ventilation (via a RecoupAerator) is one of the most necessary yet easiest steps towards healthy living.

As I have started working and learning here at UltimateAir, one thing has become eminently clear: whole house ventilation such as the RecoupAerator should be a standard in all homes, not a luxury. We must list ERVs amongst televisions, dishwashers, and toasters as essential household appliances. In this series I will not only continue this theme but explore healthy and environmentally friendly practices as well as the lasting benefits of the RecoupAerator.

If you are new to energy efficient ventilation or passive homes, learn with me!! If you are a dealer, already have a RecoupAerator, or are savvy with passive homes, bear with me!! This series will give you insight into ways of promoting and reaching others like yourself. It will allow you to rediscover and explore why clean air is so important. Or maybe you will simply find this newcomer’s views cool and refreshing.

 

Reblog! Share! Discuss!
Check out our site weekly for new articles
http://www.ultimateair.com/
and Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/RecoupAerator

Tags: Indoor Air Pollutants, ERV, Air Filration, energy efficient, Passive House, recoupaerator

A Few of UltimateAir’s Favorite Websites

Posted on Tue, May 29, 2012

UltimateAir likes to stay informed and involved in the newest and innovational ideas in green technology. To keep ourselves in the loop we like to visit a few great websites that we thought you would enjoy as well :)

 

1.  http://www.100khouse.com/

100khousePicThis website is definitely one of our favorites to visit. Its a great blog to get involved in to learn more about the science and secrets behind green home technology and passive homes. The blog is filled with interesting articles informing readers on the A to Z on everything you need to know to create an environmentally friendly and energy saving home.

 

 

 

2.  http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/

greenbuildingadvisor

Green Building Advisors is also one of our top choice websites to visit. Its an easy navigational website for the average person to learn the newest and important basics on building a green home including a mass amount of information on why products such as The RecoupAerator are an important commodity for your home. On this website, you have the opportunity to read interesting and new articles posted by experts on the newest trends and designs in green homes all over the U.S. Another great part about this website is you can blog and chat with experts to help you learn more about green energy and its importance in your home.

 

3.  http://www.homeenergy.org/

homeEnergyHome Energy is a fantastic website that’s based on a magazine. This website is perfect for referencing to learn about any home energy topics. The website touches on every subject and includes the most practical information on residential energy efficiency, performance, comfort, and affordability. UltimateAir loves Home Energy because all the content included on this website comes directly from the experts who are researching and employing innovative design, building, and remodeling practices and product.

 

Tags: Air quality tips, ERV, energy efficient, Recouperator, UltimateAir., Links

The Passive House Project

Posted on Thu, Mar 29, 2012

Enter the Passive House Project

Did you know that buildings are responsible for 48 % of greenhouse gas emissions per year and that 76 % of electricity generated goes to the building sector. In the past couple years, a new and innovative option has been brought about to establish a way to save our environment and save thousands of dollars in reduced energy usage. It goes by the name passive house which refers to the building style of buildings that are well insulated, air tight, and primarily heated by passive solar. In passive homes, energy losses are minimized and an airflow is provided through an energy recovery ventilator that purifies the air as well as prevents energy loss and keeps the air supply fresh and constant. This is where we come in as a company. Air ventilation systems such as the ones needed for a passive house are supplied by UltimateAir to ensure that the best air quality can be provided for any home, office, or school at an affordable cost. UltimateAir is one of the only companies that supplies air ventilation systems that are completely green and recover 95% of energy that would normally be lost. You don’t have to have a passive house to purchase our ventilation system called The RecoupAerator, but it makes it all the more affordable and healthy for your body, your home, and the environment.

The chart below from www.parsit.parsons.edu shows how the typical home compares to the energy savings of a passive house.

Passive House comparison chart

Tags: energy efficient, Passive House, recoupaerator

Technical Ventilation Info on Flow Control

Posted on Tue, Feb 07, 2012


The Best Ventilation System

The best ventilation system will bring in an equal amount of air that Double Shaft Fan Motor
is removed from the home, while transferring the ‘energy’ from the leaving air -into the incoming air (so you don’t waste it), and filtering it.  This is not as easy as it sounds.  Manufactured E/HRV’s which perform this function have two air moving fans.  One fan to bring fresh air in, and one fan to take stale air out.  In most products available in North America - these two fans are tied to the same single motor.  Now- if i have two duct systems, one to move air into the house, and one to remove stale air from the house... the only way that these two duct systems would have the same air flow is if (1) they were identical, (2) they were balanced with a differential pressure manometer after the system was commissioned, and the system never saw any environmental change.  It is almost impossible for either of those two cases to be true.


 


Two Independantly Controlled Motors

The UltimateAir RecoupAerator has two independent variably controlled motors controlling two independent fans.   With this capability, we have built in volumetric flow control - independent on each of the two air streams.  This uniquely allows the RecoupAerator to balance incoming vs outgoing flow with different duct systems and a dynamically changing duct condition (filter load up, impeller load up, etc), and over its full range of flow settings.

The RecoupAerator is the only unit in the industry which has ‘flat fan curves’, independent on each of its two air moving fans.

Tags: energy efficient, Air Flow, Air Flow Efficiency, Fans, Flow Control, Technical

Take Advantage of Federal Tax Credits & Increase Your Home’s Energy Efficiency

Posted on Fri, Dec 02, 2011

energy efficient homeThe federal government is currently offering two tax credits to help assist with the total cost of energy efficient products or upgrades.  Both credits require a large initial investment in order to produce years of utility savings. . 

The underlying intention and incentive behind this unique government-funded opportunity is a mutually beneficial arrangement for the homeowner to save money while boosting the US economy through market expansion from increased demand. 

Only certain highly efficient products qualify and the credit is only eligible if purchased before the end of December, in which case they can be deducted from your taxes.

Energy Efficiency Tax Credit:

  • 10% of cost up to $500 or a specific amount from $50 - $300
  • Expires on December 31, 2011
  • Existing home & principal residences
  • New construction and rentals do not qualify.

This credit will offer financial help for both improvements to the home shell and installation of any qualifying energy-efficient heating and cooling systems including:

  • Biomass Stoves
  • Heating Ventilating AC (HVAC)
  • Insulation
  • Roofs
  • Water Heaters
  • Windows & doors

The extended renewable-energy credit is slightly more flexible, allowing both primary and secondary homes to qualify, as do both new and existing homes.

Renewable Tax Credit:

  • 30% of cost with no upper limit.
  • Expires December 31, 2016.
  • Existing homes & new construction qualify.
  • Both principal residences and second homes qualify.
  • Rentals do not qualify.

Applicable for the following products:

  • Geothermal Heat Pumps
  • Small Wind Turbines
  • Solar Energy Systems

How to Apply For a Tax Credit On Your Energy Efficient Product

If installed before December 31, 2011, the credit can be applied for qualifying products through your 2011 taxes by filing IRS form 5695.  Dissimilar to a deduction, the credit will function as a reimbursement, lowering your tax burden by up to $500.

Learn more by visiting Energy Star

Tags: Homeowners, Air Filration, energy efficient, Home Energy Efficiency Best Practices, Energy Star

Commercial RecoupAerator Part of First Public School Passive House

Posted on Fri, Aug 26, 2011

passive resized 600

Ultimate Air and the RecoupAerator have been featured in the Green Mechanical Contractor’s latest article, “The Building That Teaches- First Passivhaus U.S. School Building”.

This Franklin County, Virgina public school (K-12) is the first in the United States designed to Passive House standards and is equipped with the first ever  commercial RecoupAerator on the market!

Adam Cohen, LEED AP, co-owner of Structures Design Build LLC, has been involved with the CEED project (Center for Energy Efficient Design) since 2007.

When asked why his company selected the RecoupAerator over similar products he said, “There are no other products in the United States that have this type of cutting edge technology and efficiency. We also wanted to use a U.S. based manufacturer.”

Passive House design is a fabric first approach to low energy use, and the RecoupAerator lowers energy use with its high efficiency air exchanger. It’s all about numbers, Cohen says, revolving the three metrics: heating and cooling annual demand, air tightness and overall energy use.

The United States has a huge opportunity to improve our nation’s energy efficiency by adhering to Passive House standards for new commercial and residentail building projects. As a leading air filtration/ventilation system that uses less energy than most lightbulbs, the RecoupAerator is well positioned to serve this market.

Be sure to read the full article in the latest GMC, and learn more about how the RecoupAerator can be part of your next Passive House project.

Tags: indoor air quality, energy efficient, Passive House, passivhaus, air filtration systems, public school air quality